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xZAIBIIx
Nov 10, 2021
In Arcade News
There are five major types of bungee jumping. Everyone knows the first type of bungee jumping. This is the plain old bungee jump (if there ever was such a thing). Established on the natives from Pentecost Island in the South Pacific, this is where you jump off from a platform or other tall object. Attached either through a let harness or body harness to a bungee cord or cords, you propel toward the earth. Once the cord(s) reach their maximum flexibility, you would rebound a few times. Typical jumpers practiced about 2 to 4 rebounds, giving them the impression of weightlessness. The second type of bungee jumping is addressed 'the catapult', 'reverse bungee', or 'bungee rocket'. In this version of the bungee jump, you commence on the ground and propel upwards. You are actually adhered to the land using an assortment of methods. Once the bungee cord is stretched and ready, you are freed. This has the issue of shooting the jumper upwards into the atmosphere. There is some danger in this technique of jumping although. The bungee cord has a tendency to pull the jumper towards the object it is anchored to. In the truth of the 'catapult' jump, it is commonly a lift crane. The danger is that you could hit the crane on the initial pull upwards. Obviously, following on from the initial rocket upwards, the jump is much such as the normal bungee jump. The third type of bungee jumping is known as the 'twin towers'. This type of bungee jump has solved the collision issue manufactured with the 'catapult'. In this version of the bungee jump, there are two towers or cranes with bungee cords adhered to the jumper. These are the set some distance apart, with the jumper in the middle. This has the issue of shooting the jumper straight up, since they are pulling simultaneously. This eliminates the issue for potentially hitting the platform or crane. Some commercial outfits use a metal cage with this type of operation. Nonetheless, this may require a bit extra calculations, as the added weight of the cage will increase the need for more bungee cords. The fourth type of bungee jumping is called the 'bungee run'. Although, as the name indicates, it genuinely doesn't involve any jumping in any respect. This type of bungee activity typically occurs down an inflatable runway. The object is for the runner to get as much as possible prior to the bungee cord pulls them back toward the anchor point. Competitions are actually contained this variation of the bungee sport. The fifth type of bungee jumping is named the 'bungee trampoline'. This variation involves the use of a trampoline, in addition to poles and bungee cords. The jumper starts jumping on the trampoline, in a body part harness, adhered to bungee cords. The cords are attached to poles on the sides of the trampoline. As the jumper gets up higher and higher, the cords are tightened. Using this technique, the jumper is able to go higher than they typically would with just the trampoline alone. As you can learn the're many types of bungee jumping in the modern bungee jumping movement. These are the but a few of the more familiar examples. The time to come is certain to produce even more variations of this extreme sport.
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xZAIBIIx
Nov 08, 2021
In Arcade News
A refractometer is a lab equipment that you use in measuring the fermentation level of a liquid. To measure the fermentation level the refractometer measures the amount of sugar (sugar weight or percentage Brix) in a solution. Use Of The Refractometer The equipment is mostly used by wine and beer makers. Winemakers use it to measure the ripeness of grapes and other fruits used in making the wine. Here the winemakers use the fruit juice from the fruits in order to determine if the fruits have reached their ideal level of natural fermentation. If the fruits have reached their ideal levels, the winemaker can go ahead and use them to make wine. Refractometer is also used by beer makers where they use it to determine the specific gravity of their wort. A number of mathematical formulas are used in converting Brix percentage to specific gravity which is measured at the different stages of the brewing process. It's important for the beer makers to know specific gravity of the beer in order to achieve consistency. How A Refractometer Works As mentioned, the refractometer measures the sugar content in a solution. It does this using an optical device that works like a prism. When you place a liquid on the equipment, it reacts with light and turns the reaction into a given number on the Brix percentage scale. The refractomer works just like a hydrometer, only that the refractometer requires just a small amount of liquid to operate. How To Use The Refractomer To use the equipment you need to start by calibrating it. For accurate calibration you should use distilled water. After calibrating you should add a drop of liquid (that you are measuring) under the sample plate and ensure that there are no air bubbles trapped. You should wait for 30 seconds and then read the refractometer by holding it up to a natural light source such as window or door. You should look though the eyepiece and there should be a line on the meter that corresponds to the scale on the side of the viewing screen. The reading that you see is the percentage Brix. Conclusion This is what you need to know about refractometers. To achieve ideal results you should undertake careful calibration. For the equipment to last for a long time you should avoid exposing it to damp environment. You should also avoid measuring corrosive or abrasive chemicals.
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xZAIBIIx
Nov 06, 2021
In Random
Choosing strings to use for your instrument can be a daunting task. Here are 7 things to consider: 1. Instrument Size Before doing anything else, make sure you know what size your instrument is. You can find the size by looking inside the F-hole/sound hole on the front of your instrument, or by checking with your teacher. If you are playing on a 1/2-size violin, for example, make sure to get 1/2-size violin strings. 2. Thickness or "Gauge" of String The "gauge" of a string is simply a measure of its thickness. The gauge determines how much tension is put on your instrument, bridge, etc. It also affects how easy it is to get sound out of the instrument, and how powerful the sound will be. For full-size instruments, strings generally come in 3 gauges. Different string companies label strings using terms taken from various languages; the following is a guide to the terminology used by string makers: Soft/Light/Weich/Dolce - This is the thinnest that strings come, and a great starting place for beginners. Because it is thin, it produces a gentle sound, and is generally easier for beginners to get good sound out of. Medium/Mezzo/Mittel - If you want a stronger sound than you are getting out of your soft strings, try a medium. Medium strings project well, but are also not too difficult to play on. Strong/Heavy/Thick/Forte/Stark - If you are an experienced musician looking for some power in your playing, go for a strong/forte string. This gauge is generally meant for projection, so be careful about using these strings in ensemble playing. If you are not sure which gauge you should get, medium/mezzo/mittel is a good place to start. Strings for smaller instruments are generally made just in mezzo/medium. 3. Core Strings are made using various materials for the core. The material used for the core affects the sound produced by the string. Synthetic - These cores are made of a special kind of nylon. These strings respond quickly when played, and give a good range of tone. Steel - Steel strings are easier to make sound on, but are not quite as flexible as synthetic strings. Gut - Gut strings are not commonly used except to perform Baroque music. If you are an advanced player looking to experiment with new sound possibilities, gut may be a good option. 4. Winding Winding refers to the material wrapped around the core--the surface that the bow grips to make sound. If you have certain skin sensitivities, you may need to get gold- or silver-wound strings. 5. Mix Don't worry about putting four matching strings on your instrument. In fact, most performers prefer to mix strings from various brands, gauges, etc. Using multiple brands or types of strings will give your instrument a broader range of possibilities. Check with your teacher or with other people who play your instrument to find out what kinds of combinations they like to use. 6. String Ends (for Violins) Violin E-strings come with either a loop or a ball at one end of the string. If the fine tuner on your violin has one prong, buy a string with a loop end. If it comes with two prongs, get a ball end. 7. Tuning (for Basses) If you play string bass, you need to watch for the tuning of the strings that you are buying. Bass strings are made in orchestra tuning (G, D, A, and E) and in solo tuning (A, E, B, & F#). Unless your teacher has specified solo tuning, you will probably want orchestra strings. Experiment! Ultimately, the kind of strings that you get is up to you and what you are looking for as a performer. Try experimenting with different strings as you go along. Some performers find it helpful to keep in their case a small diary of strings. Every time they get a new string, they make a note in the diary of what they like about the string, how it responds with their instrument, etc. Over time, you can develop a lot of good information about your own preferences as a musician. Not every string will work well for every musician, but don't be afraid to jump in and start trying new strings. You might just find a string or combination that you fall in love with. Gregory and his wife, Elizabeth, teach piano and cello. They love music, and love helping others have good experiences with music. To find more ideas for beginning string players, visit their blog at [http://www.theclassymusician.com].
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